• Deutsch
  • English

St. Annen-Straße 11 - Martha Hotzner

Martha Hotzner had lived in the Jewish Seniors’ Home at St. Annen-Straße 11 since 1930.

Martha was born in Lübeck on 2 May 1885.  Her parents were Jacob Leweck Hotzner and Johanna (usually called Hannchen) Hotzner nee Frankenthal (born 1854).  Martha also had a younger brother, Herman and an older half-brother, Samuel, from Jacob’s earlier marriage to Fanny nee Kirschbaum.

The Hotzner family lived at Fleischhauerstraße 15 until Jacob died.  Now Johanna Hotzner was a widow and was noted as such in the Lübeck Address Book, first in 1910 with residence at Engelgrube 56 and then in 1913 with residence one door down at Engelgrube 54.  Also in 1913 she requested, that her name be entered as Hotzner, which was more fitting to the German situation than the original spelling of Hoczner.  The 1913 Address Book reflected that request.

Martha, who remained single, had completed her formal education with becoming a „Stütze“ that is a domestic working in Travemünde, Altona and Bremen.  Yet in 1910 she once again was living with her mother.

In October 1930 mother and daughter moved to the Jewish Community’s Seniors’ Home located at St. Annenstraße 11.  Martha Hotzner continued to live at the home even after her mother’s death on 12 April 1939.

Just a few months before Johanna’s death, they both went through the government mandated process to legally add “Sara” as their first names since they were Jews.  Their hand written declarations were made on simple card stock.

The declaration by Martha Hotzner that she would legally add the obligatory name of Sara to her own. Hanseatic City of Lübeck Archives, Police Adminstration 124.
The declaration by Martha Hotzner that she would legally add the obligatory name of Sara to her own.  Hanseatic City of Lübeck Archives, Police Adminstration 124.
The declaration by Johanna Hotzner that she would legally add the obligatory name of Sara to her own. Hanseatic City of Lübeck Archives, Police Adminstration 124.
The declaration by Johanna Hotzner that she would legally add the obligatory name of Sara to her own.  Hanseatic City of Lübeck Archives, Police Adminstration 124.
Document for the changing the spelling of the last name. Hanseatic City of Lübeck Archives, Main Office 909
Document for the changing the spelling of the last name.  Hanseatic City of Lübeck Archives, Main Office 909

Even family name changes made before 1938, as was the case with the Hotzner family, were declared null and void  A letter from the Regional Chief Administrator dated 5 October 1938 dealing with this matter also reveals that permission was granted to Hermann Hotzner and his family to emigrate to the USA.

Martha Hotzner was 56 years old when she was deported to Riga on 6 December 1941.

It is not known under what circumstances Martha died. Had she survived starvation and the cold in the winter of 1941-42 in Camp Jungfernhof?  Was Martha Hotzner among the many people, who were transported to the Bikernieki Forest in February and March of 1942 and were shot there?  Or did she survive a selection and in turn was sent to do slave labour, maybe even “light work,” in one of the many sub-camps in and around Riga?  Did she die in the Riga Ghetto or in KZ (concentration camp) Kaiserwald?  Was she transported to KZ Stutthof when the Red Army’s western advance brought it too closely to Riga, only to be murdered there?

Also nothing is known about the fate of her brother, Samuel, who left Lübeck to live in Freiburg im Breisgau.

References in Addition to Standard Reference Materials:

  • Adressbücher und Melderegister der Hansestadt Lübeck (Address and Registration Records of the Hanseatic City of Lübeck)
  • Archiv der Hansestadt Lübeck, Staatliche Polizeiverwaltung 109, 110, 124;
  • Liste des Ordnungsamtes von 1963 über den Verbleib jüdischer Menschen, Hauptamt 909
  • Buch der Erinnerung, Die ins Baltikum deportierten deutschen, österreichischen und tschechoslowakischen Juden, bearbeitet von Wolfgang Scheffler und Diana Schulle, München 2003
  • Datenpool JSHD der Forschungsstelle “Juden in Schleswig-Holstein” an der Universität Flensburg
  • Memorbuch zum Gedenken an die jüdischen, in der Schoa umgekommenen Schleswig-Holsteiner und Schleswig-Holsteinerinnen, hrsg. v. Miriam Gillis-Carlebach, Hamburg 1996
  • Personenstandsregister der Jüdischen Gemeinde Lübeck und Moisling
  • Albrecht Schreiber, Zwischen Davidstern und Doppeladler, Illustrierte Chronik der Juden in Moisling und Lübeck, Lübeck 1992
  • Yad Vashem, The Central Database of Shoah Victims’ Names

Heidemarie Kugler-Weiemann, 2010

Translation:  Glenn Sellick and Martin Harnisch 2010